Ongoing: Democracy + Communism: Synopsis: Communism, across time + geography: Dem-Com_009

Left - On this day, October 5th, 2014, the United States held its Midterm Elections - its multi-party ticket an unimaginable reality in autocratic Bulgaria pre-1989. (R-L) Here, Simona Kostova, from Bulgaria's voting commission, watches as a woman prepares to place her vote in the ballot box during Parliamentary elections in the nation's capital, Sofia. Despite a month-long vacillations - and that only 49% of the population turned up to vote - party leaders narrowly avoided reelections, with former prime minister and leader of center-right party GERB Boyko Borisov reinstated at the post.Right - Children wearing the uniform of communist youth are directed to salute {quote}Votó!{quote} ({quote}S/he voted!{quote}) as a woman places her ballot in Cuba's Elecciones Parciales (Partial Elections) to elect delegates to the Municipal Assemblies of People’s Power, the country's unicameral parliament, on April 19, 2015 in Havana, Cuba. The delegates function as district representatives for a 2.5 year term.Elementary schoolchildren in many Communist countries (Cuba and pre-1989 Bulgaria included,) wear scarves as part of the uniform of the children’s Communist youth - blue or red in color depending on their age. Little Pioneers - members of the José Martí Pioneer Organization for children operated by the communist party in Cuba - are often sent to people's homes to motivate citizens to the polls. Voting is not mandatory, but frowned upon if not exercised. I've used diptychs to bridge one country’s past - communist Cuba - to another country’s present - post-1989 Bulgaria - to show that political ideals, its profiteers and its victims, can remain unchanged by time or geography.

Left - On this day, October 5th, 2014, the United States held its Midterm Elections - its multi-party ticket an unimaginable reality in autocratic Bulgaria pre-1989.  

(R-L) Here, Simona Kostova, from Bulgaria's voting commission, watches as a woman prepares to place her vote in the ballot box during Parliamentary elections in the nation's capital, Sofia. Despite a month-long vacillations - and that only 49% of the population turned up to vote - party leaders narrowly avoided reelections, with former prime minister and leader of center-right party GERB Boyko Borisov reinstated at the post. 

Right - Children wearing the uniform of communist youth are directed to salute "Votó!" ("S/he voted!") as a woman places her ballot in Cuba's Elecciones Parciales (Partial Elections) to elect delegates to the Municipal Assemblies of People’s Power, the country's unicameral parliament, on April 19, 2015 in Havana, Cuba. The delegates function as district representatives for a 2.5 year term. 

Elementary schoolchildren in many Communist countries (Cuba and pre-1989 Bulgaria included,) wear scarves as part of the uniform of the children’s Communist youth - blue or red in color depending on their age. Little Pioneers - members of the José Martí Pioneer Organization for children operated by the communist party in Cuba - are often sent to people's homes to motivate citizens to the polls. Voting is not mandatory, but frowned upon if not exercised.  

I've used diptychs to bridge one country’s past - communist Cuba - to another country’s present - post-1989 Bulgaria - to show that political ideals, its profiteers and its victims, can remain unchanged by time or geography.