Ongoing: Democracy + Communism: Synopsis: Communism, across time + geography: Dem-Com_002

Pre-1989 Bulgaria was a world nearly completely clean of advertisement: private enterprise was forbidden, eliminating retailer and manufacturer competition on production of a very limited supply of goods, that few people could afford anyway. Although entrepreneurship exists both legally and illegally on the vast government-owned landscape of Cuba, payroll taxes that increase disproportionately with the rise of annual profit discourage its expansion. Propaganda fills the space that consumerism leaves on this Havana street (a famously ubiquitous sight across the nation.) A sign for the Young Communist League (Unión de Jóvenes Comunistas,) reading {quote}Everything for the Revolution,{quote} stretches across a billboard next to the organization's motto {quote}Estudio, Trabajo, Fusil{quote} ({quote}Study, Work, Rifle,{quote}) and the likes of Cuban revolutionaries Julio Antonio Mella, Che Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos. While the organization's membership is voluntary (and selective - based on a clean record of pro-government views,) it is highly encouraged for social and professional success. Cuba, a place of much recent conversation, is a country whose politics and way of life parallel much of my childhood in Bulgaria. This is 2015's continuation to my project on democracy + communism, started last year on the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall - the event that gave opportunity to Eastern Europeans like me to immigrate to the Western world. These are the ways in which Cuba has transported me to pre- and post-1989 Bulgaria.

Pre-1989 Bulgaria was a world nearly completely clean of advertisement: private enterprise was forbidden, eliminating retailer and manufacturer competition on production of a very limited supply of goods, that few people could afford anyway.  

Although entrepreneurship exists both legally and illegally on the vast government-owned landscape of Cuba, payroll taxes that increase disproportionately with the rise of annual profit discourage its expansion.  

Propaganda fills the space that consumerism leaves on this Havana street (a famously ubiquitous sight across the nation.) A sign for the Young Communist League (Unión de Jóvenes Comunistas,) reading "Everything for the Revolution," stretches across a billboard next to the organization's motto "Estudio, Trabajo, Fusil" ("Study, Work, Rifle,") and the likes of Cuban revolutionaries Julio Antonio Mella, Che Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos. While the organization's membership is voluntary (and selective - based on a clean record of pro-government views,) it is highly encouraged for social and professional success.  

Cuba, a place of much recent conversation, is a country whose politics and way of life parallel much of my childhood in Bulgaria. This is 2015's continuation to my project on democracy + communism, started last year on the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall - the event that gave opportunity to Eastern Europeans like me to immigrate to the Western world. These are the ways in which Cuba has transported me to pre- and post-1989 Bulgaria.