Ongoing: Democracy + Communism: Synopsis: Communism, across time + geography: Dem-Com_001

Left - Women practice Chen-style t'ai chi ch'uan under a fresco of Cuban revolutionary philosopher and political theorist Jose Marti and communist revolutionary leader Che Guevara in Mariel, Cuba on April 20, 2015. Images of government idols and propaganda - a famously ubiquitous sight across Cuba - fill the space that a purposeful absence of advertising leaves in printed media, billboards, and buildings.Right - A woman walks by graffiti of the fist that came to symbolize civic protests against political corruption in 2013, seen in Bulgaria's capital Sofia, on October 4th, 2014. The fist has been crossed off by a second layer of graffiti, with an adjacent sign that reads, {quote}Communism, but not a Colony,{quote} in likely reference to what some political parties decry as Westernization of interests in the country.  I've used diptychs to bridge one country’s past - communist Cuba - to another country’s present - post-1989 Bulgaria - to show that political ideals, its profiteers and its victims, can remain unchanged by time or geography.

Left - Women practice Chen-style t'ai chi ch'uan under a fresco of Cuban revolutionary philosopher and political theorist Jose Marti and communist revolutionary leader Che Guevara in Mariel, Cuba on April 20, 2015. Images of government idols and propaganda - a famously ubiquitous sight across Cuba - fill the space that a purposeful absence of advertising leaves in printed media, billboards, and buildings. 

Right - A woman walks by graffiti of the fist that came to symbolize civic protests against political corruption in 2013, seen in Bulgaria's capital Sofia, on October 4th, 2014. The fist has been crossed off by a second layer of graffiti, with an adjacent sign that reads, "Communism, but not a Colony," in likely reference to what some political parties decry as Westernization of interests in the country.  

I've used diptychs to bridge one country’s past - communist Cuba - to another country’s present - post-1989 Bulgaria - to show that political ideals, its profiteers and its victims, can remain unchanged by time or geography.